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NASA’s Hubble Telescope Discovers the Oldest and Farthest Star

NASA’s Hubble Telescope Discovers the Oldest and Farthest Star Arendelle’s mass  which is millions of times brighter than our Sun.

Astronomers have discovered the most distant and oldest star ever observed in the universe. This star shined 12.9 billion years ago too. Light from this star must have traveled 12.9 billion light-years to reach Earth. Astronomers say the newly discovered star appeared as it did when the universe was just 7 percent of its current age. It has been seen by Hubble Space Telescope and shared its image on its Instagram handle. According to its caption, Hubble has broken the record by seeing the farthest individual star ever seen.

This star has been named Arendel. Astronomers say that Arendelle began to sparkle in the first billion years of our universe. Arendelle’s mass is estimated to be 50 times the mass of our Sun. Even in terms of brightness, it is millions of times brighter than our Sun.

Brian Welch, the author of the paper published in the journal Nature, said that at first he did not believe the discovery because the star was too far from the redshift star. Significantly, redshift and blueshift describe the change in frequency of a light wave. It depends on whether an object is moving towards us or is moving away. When an object is moving away from us, the light emitted by it is called redshift and when something is moving towards us, the light emitted by it is called blueshift.

According to the research team, Arendelle’s mass is estimated to be at least 50 times the mass of the Sun and millions of times more luminous. It collides with the larger stars discovered so far. NASA has also released a video related to this discovery.

According to astronomers, more information about Arendelle will be revealed for many years to come, as NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will observe it. However, astronomers will also find out whether Arendelle is composed entirely of primordial hydrogen and helium. If this happens, it will be the first evidence of Population III stars, which are believed to be the first stars to form after the Big Bang.

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